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Ceramic Crochet by Slayer-Igraine Ceramic Crochet by Slayer-Igraine
maths + crochet + ceramics = Not-so-soft sculpture.
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:iconverulka:
verulka Featured By Owner Nov 3, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
You have been featured here [link] . :P
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:iconcyndrome:
Cyndrome Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
What an awesome idea!
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:iconthemagentacrayon:
TheMagentaCrayon Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
That is so freaking amazing, I can't wrap my head around it! O.O Love it!
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
Thank you. ^^
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:iconjpcustom:
jpcustom Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
slip drenched yarn + crochet then slow bisque to burn out organics? that's my best guess

very very awesome idea tho :) well done
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
Yup, that was it. :) thanks.
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:iconverulka:
verulka Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I am curious to understand, how did you do that? It's very good! :clap:
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
It was a normal crocheted hyperbolic growth, dipped in earthenware slip and then fired. :)
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:iconverulka:
verulka Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
And does the crocheted hyperbolic growth burned? And did you glazed it after that? And how did you preserve it to don't, broke, it's very thin I guess...It's really interesting.
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
Yeah, the yarn burns away. And yes, I had to glaze it, it was earthenware and very fragile. I did do a knitting porcelain square as well, which I left unglazed. Still very fragile, but more structural integrity than the earthenware. I'd like to try the hyperbolic growth in porcelain, too, but I figured it was better to stick with earthenware for the first attempt. It's a complicated enough shape as is without trying to factor in the greater warping that'd happen with porcelain. <_<
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:iconverulka:
verulka Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
It's just amazing! I wanna try it and I will. So you firing twice? Firstly in biscuit and secondly to glaze it, or you firing at once? Also does it have matter what kind of yarn do you use? And did you make small trips so the hot air can go , or it's not necessary? Lot of questions, but I wanna make it good.. :blush:
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
Yeah, I fired twice. First was one was pretty slow - I ramped to 100 Celsius at 10 degrees inc per hour, and the let it soak at that temp for an hour, just to be sure that everything in the middle of the 'sculpture' was dry. Then ramped to 200 degrees at 30 degrees inc per hour, then to 600 celsius at 70 degrees per hour (at this point you might get quite a lot of smoke coming out <_<) and then fast-ramped up to 1100. I used a cheap, crappy acrylic yarn, because wool is way more expensive, but I guess if you can afford it wool is preferable. Acrylic yarn will let off a lot of nasty black smoke, and stink the place out. I crocheted the growth quite loosely with a hook larger than was recommended for that yarn thickness, so there were lots of holes for the hot air to circulate.

Also: hyperbolic growths eat up a lot of yarn, and have a massive surface area, so they'll soak up a lot of slip, too. It makes them quite heavy. When I dipped other knitted shapes in slip I had no problem at all with smoke coming out of the kiln, but with the hyperbolic shape smoke was pouring out the top quite alarmingly. I presume this is just because the hyperbolic shape just uses so much more yarn.
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:iconverulka:
verulka Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you very much for that good explanation! I definitely going to use your method to create something. I am going to take all your advices and suggestions. Thanks again and looking forward to see new art from you! Good luck!
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 16, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
Good luck! And thanks. :)
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:iconmoonwolf17:
moonwolf17 Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
:omg: oh my god! that's amazing! how did you do this!! :clap:
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:iconslayer-igraine:
Slayer-Igraine Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2012  Student Artisan Crafter
Thanks. ^^ It was a normal piece crocheted hyperbolic growth dipped in earthenware slip. :)
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:iconmoonwolf17:
moonwolf17 Featured By Owner Sep 8, 2012
sounds more like science than art and craft :giggle: wonderful work :love:
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August 16, 2012
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